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Do you want to be part of the discussion about Northern Post-Secondary Education? Join a virtual or in-person engagement session - just click on your home region below.

Please note: these sessions are for people from the northern regions below to share their stories. We are not inviting members of the media, or people from outside the region with an academic or policy interest to attend the sessions as their presence may constrain discussion. The Task Force will be producing reports that summarize and quote what is said in the engagement sessions. 

Due to ongoing public health advice, we cannot schedule in-person sessions in all regions. After you sign up, we will contact you you with the times and dates of engagement sessions, and whether they will be online or in person.

Select your region:

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Yukon

About 23% of the territory’s 41,000 people identify as Indigenous. It has 15 communities, all but one of them connected by road. Whitehorse is by far the largest community, containing about 75% of the population of the territory. In 2016, 68% of Yukoners aged 25 to 64 had a postsecondary qualification, the highest proportion in Canada. Of the Yukon Indigenous population aged 25 to 64, just over 50% had some post-secondary education. Of the Yukoners with a post-secondary qualification who studied in Canada, 30% studied in Yukon.

An evaluation of the territory’s schools was done last year by the office of the Auditor General of Canada. Two key findings from that audit were that the territory did not do enough to identify the causes of gaps in educational outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students, and that it did not do enough to meet its culture and language responsibilities to Yukon First Nations.

Yukon University, centred in Whitehorse is the only post-secondary institution in the territory. The university transitioned from college status on May 9th, 2020. The Yukon Research Centre is co-located with the university. Apart from the main Whitehorse campus, there are smaller branches in twelve other communities that provide a much smaller range of courses. In 2018-19, just over 6,000 students were registered at the University (then a college), about 80% in non-credit courses. 28% of credit students were Indigenous (30% among full-time, 25% among part-time). The median age of credit students was 26 years old. Over this academic year (2020-2021) the university will be developing its Strategic Plan and Academic Plan. It expects to launch a new BA program in Northern Studies the following academic year.

 


Useful links:


 

Yukon

About 23% of the territory’s 41,000 people identify as Indigenous. It has 15 communities, all but one of them connected by road. Whitehorse is by far the largest community, containing about 75% of the population of the territory. In 2016, 68% of Yukoners aged 25 to 64 had a postsecondary qualification, the highest proportion in Canada. Of the Yukon Indigenous population aged 25 to 64, just over 50% had some post-secondary education. Of the Yukoners with a post-secondary qualification who studied in Canada, 30% studied in Yukon.

An evaluation of the territory’s schools was done last year by the office of the Auditor General of Canada. Two key findings from that audit were that the territory did not do enough to identify the causes of gaps in educational outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students, and that it did not do enough to meet its culture and language responsibilities to Yukon First Nations.

Yukon University, centred in Whitehorse is the only post-secondary institution in the territory. The university transitioned from college status on May 9th, 2020. The Yukon Research Centre is co-located with the university. Apart from the main Whitehorse campus, there are smaller branches in twelve other communities that provide a much smaller range of courses. In 2018-19, just over 6,000 students were registered at the University (then a college), about 80% in non-credit courses. 28% of credit students were Indigenous (30% among full-time, 25% among part-time). The median age of credit students was 26 years old. Over this academic year (2020-2021) the university will be developing its Strategic Plan and Academic Plan. It expects to launch a new BA program in Northern Studies the following academic year.

 


Useful links:


 

Yukon

About 23% of the territory’s 41,000 people identify as Indigenous. It has 15 communities, all but one of them connected by road. Whitehorse is by far the largest community, containing about 75% of the population of the territory. In 2016, 68% of Yukoners aged 25 to 64 had a postsecondary qualification, the highest proportion in Canada. Of the Yukon Indigenous population aged 25 to 64, just over 50% had some post-secondary education. Of the Yukoners with a post-secondary qualification who studied in Canada, 30% studied in Yukon.

An evaluation of the territory’s schools was done last year by the office of the Auditor General of Canada. Two key findings from that audit were that the territory did not do enough to identify the causes of gaps in educational outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students, and that it did not do enough to meet its culture and language responsibilities to Yukon First Nations.

Yukon University, centred in Whitehorse is the only post-secondary institution in the territory. The university transitioned from college status on May 9th, 2020. The Yukon Research Centre is co-located with the university. Apart from the main Whitehorse campus, there are smaller branches in twelve other communities that provide a much smaller range of courses. In 2018-19, just over 6,000 students were registered at the University (then a college), about 80% in non-credit courses. 28% of credit students were Indigenous (30% among full-time, 25% among part-time). The median age of credit students was 26 years old. Over this academic year (2020-2021) the university will be developing its Strategic Plan and Academic Plan. It expects to launch a new BA program in Northern Studies the following academic year.

 


Useful links:


 

Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories has a population of almost 45,000 people in 33 communities. 46% of people live in Yellowknife. About 50% of the population is Indigenous. Just under 50% of the population has some post-secondary education. In the Indigenous population, 33% have some post-secondary education, and 14% have a less than grade 9 education. Current post-secondary education rates in the territory are below the national average. In 2016, 20% of people aged 25-64 did not have a high school diploma or some form of postsecondary education. Many of those with lower formal education levels are in smaller communities, where as many as 68% of the population did not have a high school diploma in 2016.

The Northwest Territories currently has one public post-secondary institution, Aurora College. The post-secondary education ecosystem also includes Collège Nordique Francophone (Collège Nordique) a not-for-profit community college, and the Dechinta Centre for Research and Learning, an Indigenous-led and land-based post-secondary education and research institution. All three offer complementary programming and work together to meet the post-secondary
education needs of the Northwest Territories.

Aurora College was established in 1981 and operates three campuses and 21 community learning centres across the NWT. The College offers certificates and diplomas focused on preparing students for employment in the trades, environmental management and administrative services. The College delivers a Bachelor of Science nursing program and a Bachelor of Education. The majority of the available programs are delivered in Fort Smith, with some in Yellowknife, and some in Inuvik. Community learning centres offer a variety of programs including upgrading, university preparation and adult basic education.


Useful links:

Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories has a population of almost 45,000 people in 33 communities. 46% of people live in Yellowknife. About 50% of the population is Indigenous. Just under 50% of the population has some post-secondary education. In the Indigenous population, 33% have some post-secondary education, and 14% have a less than grade 9 education. Current post-secondary education rates in the territory are below the national average. In 2016, 20% of people aged 25-64 did not have a high school diploma or some form of postsecondary education. Many of those with lower formal education levels are in smaller communities, where as many as 68% of the population did not have a high school diploma in 2016.

The Northwest Territories currently has one public post-secondary institution, Aurora College. The post-secondary education ecosystem also includes Collège Nordique Francophone (Collège Nordique) a not-for-profit community college, and the Dechinta Centre for Research and Learning, an Indigenous-led and land-based post-secondary education and research institution. All three offer complementary programming and work together to meet the post-secondary
education needs of the Northwest Territories.

Aurora College was established in 1981 and operates three campuses and 21 community learning centres across the NWT. The College offers certificates and diplomas focused on preparing students for employment in the trades, environmental management and administrative services. The College delivers a Bachelor of Science nursing program and a Bachelor of Education. The majority of the available programs are delivered in Fort Smith, with some in Yellowknife, and some in Inuvik. Community learning centres offer a variety of programs including upgrading, university preparation and adult basic education.


Useful links:

Northwest Territories

The Northwest Territories has a population of almost 45,000 people in 33 communities. 46% of people live in Yellowknife. About 50% of the population is Indigenous. Just under 50% of the population has some post-secondary education. In the Indigenous population, 33% have some post-secondary education, and 14% have a less than grade 9 education. Current post-secondary education rates in the territory are below the national average. In 2016, 20% of people aged 25-64 did not have a high school diploma or some form of postsecondary education. Many of those with lower formal education levels are in smaller communities, where as many as 68% of the population did not have a high school diploma in 2016.

The Northwest Territories currently has one public post-secondary institution, Aurora College. The post-secondary education ecosystem also includes Collège Nordique Francophone (Collège Nordique) a not-for-profit community college, and the Dechinta Centre for Research and Learning, an Indigenous-led and land-based post-secondary education and research institution. All three offer complementary programming and work together to meet the post-secondary
education needs of the Northwest Territories.

Aurora College was established in 1981 and operates three campuses and 21 community learning centres across the NWT. The College offers certificates and diplomas focused on preparing students for employment in the trades, environmental management and administrative services. The College delivers a Bachelor of Science nursing program and a Bachelor of Education. The majority of the available programs are delivered in Fort Smith, with some in Yellowknife, and some in Inuvik. Community learning centres offer a variety of programs including upgrading, university preparation and adult basic education.


Useful links:

Nunavut

Nunavut has a population of 38,000 people spread over 25 communities. About 84% of the population is Inuit. There are no roads connecting communities. Attendance rates in the territory’s schools are under 70%. Of the population over 15 years old, 34% have some sort of post-secondary certification.

The territory’s only post-secondary institution, Nunavut Arctic College was established in 1995,and serves about 1,500 students a year. Community Learning Centres are located in each community. Some students attend Nunavut Sivuniksavut, an Ottawa-based program that provides cultural and academic courses. Many students go on from there to other post-secondary education.

The Nunavut Innovation and Research Institute is a division of the College. It is mandated to identify community needs for research and technology and act as the science advisor to the Government of Nunavut. The Institute also supports College researchers and seeks to promote and preserve the use of traditional Inuit knowledge and technology.

 


Useful links:

  • The Website for Nunavut Arctic College Nunavut’s public post-secondary institution

  • A public survey on Nunavut Arctic College’s 10-year strategic plan

  • The website for Nunavut Sivuniksavut, a silattuqsarvik (Inuktitut for "a place and time to become wise") based in Ottawa and dedicated to providing Inuit youth with cultural and academic experiences needed to contribute to the building of Nunavut.


 

Nunavut

Nunavut has a population of 38,000 people spread over 25 communities. About 84% of the population is Inuit. There are no roads connecting communities. Attendance rates in the territory’s schools are under 70%. Of the population over 15 years old, 34% have some sort of post-secondary certification.

The territory’s only post-secondary institution, Nunavut Arctic College was established in 1995,and serves about 1,500 students a year. Community Learning Centres are located in each community. Some students attend Nunavut Sivuniksavut, an Ottawa-based program that provides cultural and academic courses. Many students go on from there to other post-secondary education.

The Nunavut Innovation and Research Institute is a division of the College. It is mandated to identify community needs for research and technology and act as the science advisor to the Government of Nunavut. The Institute also supports College researchers and seeks to promote and preserve the use of traditional Inuit knowledge and technology.

 


Useful links:

  • The Website for Nunavut Arctic College Nunavut’s public post-secondary institution

  • A public survey on Nunavut Arctic College’s 10-year strategic plan

  • The website for Nunavut Sivuniksavut, a silattuqsarvik (Inuktitut for "a place and time to become wise") based in Ottawa and dedicated to providing Inuit youth with cultural and academic experiences needed to contribute to the building of Nunavut.


 

Nunavut

Nunavut has a population of 38,000 people spread over 25 communities. About 84% of the population is Inuit. There are no roads connecting communities. Attendance rates in the territory’s schools are under 70%. Of the population over 15 years old, 34% have some sort of post-secondary certification.

The territory’s only post-secondary institution, Nunavut Arctic College was established in 1995,and serves about 1,500 students a year. Community Learning Centres are located in each community. Some students attend Nunavut Sivuniksavut, an Ottawa-based program that provides cultural and academic courses. Many students go on from there to other post-secondary education.

The Nunavut Innovation and Research Institute is a division of the College. It is mandated to identify community needs for research and technology and act as the science advisor to the Government of Nunavut. The Institute also supports College researchers and seeks to promote and preserve the use of traditional Inuit knowledge and technology.

 


Useful links:

  • The Website for Nunavut Arctic College Nunavut’s public post-secondary institution

  • A public survey on Nunavut Arctic College’s 10-year strategic plan

  • The website for Nunavut Sivuniksavut, a silattuqsarvik (Inuktitut for "a place and time to become wise") based in Ottawa and dedicated to providing Inuit youth with cultural and academic experiences needed to contribute to the building of Nunavut.


 

Northern Manitoba

Northern Manitoba as defined by the province covers about 67% of the province, but has less than 8% of its people, more than 88,000. The mining centre of Thompson, population around 14,000, is the largest community in the northern part of the province; The Pas, a historic mining town, has fewer than 6,000 people. Nearly 75% of the population is Indigenous, with nearly 50% living on First Nations where unemployment is typically above 75%, and where 52% of the population do not have a grade 12 education.

The Manitoba government converted Keewatin Community College to University College of the North in 2004. The University College has close to 1,800 students at its two campuses (Thompson and The Pas). Most of its programming is at the adult upgrading, trades, and diploma levels, although it also offers degrees in the arts, business, and community development, among others, as well as a series of northern and Indigenous studies diplomas. Students often complete one or two years at University College of the North before continuing their studies at other institutions.

There are twelve “regional centres” in smaller communities that offer a variety of programs, consisting of a few accredited programs in subjects such as health care, social work, and trades, and also several diverse continuing education courses in subjects such as computer skills, Cree language training, first aid, and polar bear monitoring. The regional centres had 1,381 registered students in 2018.

 


Useful links:


 

Northern Manitoba

Northern Manitoba as defined by the province covers about 67% of the province, but has less than 8% of its people, more than 88,000. The mining centre of Thompson, population around 14,000, is the largest community in the northern part of the province; The Pas, a historic mining town, has fewer than 6,000 people. Nearly 75% of the population is Indigenous, with nearly 50% living on First Nations where unemployment is typically above 75%, and where 52% of the population do not have a grade 12 education.

The Manitoba government converted Keewatin Community College to University College of the North in 2004. The University College has close to 1,800 students at its two campuses (Thompson and The Pas). Most of its programming is at the adult upgrading, trades, and diploma levels, although it also offers degrees in the arts, business, and community development, among others, as well as a series of northern and Indigenous studies diplomas. Students often complete one or two years at University College of the North before continuing their studies at other institutions.

There are twelve “regional centres” in smaller communities that offer a variety of programs, consisting of a few accredited programs in subjects such as health care, social work, and trades, and also several diverse continuing education courses in subjects such as computer skills, Cree language training, first aid, and polar bear monitoring. The regional centres had 1,381 registered students in 2018.

 


Useful links:


 

Northern Manitoba

Northern Manitoba as defined by the province covers about 67% of the province, but has less than 8% of its people, more than 88,000. The mining centre of Thompson, population around 14,000, is the largest community in the northern part of the province; The Pas, a historic mining town, has fewer than 6,000 people. Nearly 75% of the population is Indigenous, with nearly 50% living on First Nations where unemployment is typically above 75%, and where 52% of the population do not have a grade 12 education.

The Manitoba government converted Keewatin Community College to University College of the North in 2004. The University College has close to 1,800 students at its two campuses (Thompson and The Pas). Most of its programming is at the adult upgrading, trades, and diploma levels, although it also offers degrees in the arts, business, and community development, among others, as well as a series of northern and Indigenous studies diplomas. Students often complete one or two years at University College of the North before continuing their studies at other institutions.

There are twelve “regional centres” in smaller communities that offer a variety of programs, consisting of a few accredited programs in subjects such as health care, social work, and trades, and also several diverse continuing education courses in subjects such as computer skills, Cree language training, first aid, and polar bear monitoring. The regional centres had 1,381 registered students in 2018.

 


Useful links:


 

Nunavik

Nunavik has a population of just over 13,000 people, about 90% of whom are Inuit, living in 14 communities. Kuujjuaq is the largest centre, with about 2,400 people. Of the population over 15 years old, just over a quarter have some sort of post-secondary qualification.

The Kativik Ilisarniliriniq, the school board of Nunavik, was created in 1975, under the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement (JBNQA). Since 1978, the Kativik Ilisarniliriniq has been the exclusive provider of academic services to the population of Nunavik. The education programs developed by the school board are offered in all schools of the 14 Nunavik communities, in Inuktitut as first language and in French and English as second languages. The school board operates 17 primary and secondary schools as well as 5 adult education centres.

There is no post-secondary institution in Nunavik. Kativik Ilisarniliriniq provides post-secondary support (both practical and financial) to students from the region who attend post-secondary institutions outside the region. In 2015-16, it was sponsoring 127 post-secondary students. It also provides diploma level vocational training in twelve subjects, mostly delivered in Kuujjuaq and Inukjuaq in 2015-16, 420 people were taking adult education and vocational training courses.

 


Useful links:

  • The website for Kativik Ilisarniliriniq, the school board for Nunavik.

  • The website for Nunavik Sivunitsavut, a place for Inuit from Nunavik to take a one-year college program during which students explore global modern issues from an Inuit perspective.


 

Nunavik

Nunavik has a population of just over 13,000 people, about 90% of whom are Inuit, living in 14 communities. Kuujjuaq is the largest centre, with about 2,400 people. Of the population over 15 years old, just over a quarter have some sort of post-secondary qualification.

The Kativik Ilisarniliriniq, the school board of Nunavik, was created in 1975, under the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement (JBNQA). Since 1978, the Kativik Ilisarniliriniq has been the exclusive provider of academic services to the population of Nunavik. The education programs developed by the school board are offered in all schools of the 14 Nunavik communities, in Inuktitut as first language and in French and English as second languages. The school board operates 17 primary and secondary schools as well as 5 adult education centres.

There is no post-secondary institution in Nunavik. Kativik Ilisarniliriniq provides post-secondary support (both practical and financial) to students from the region who attend post-secondary institutions outside the region. In 2015-16, it was sponsoring 127 post-secondary students. It also provides diploma level vocational training in twelve subjects, mostly delivered in Kuujjuaq and Inukjuaq in 2015-16, 420 people were taking adult education and vocational training courses.

 


Useful links:

  • The website for Kativik Ilisarniliriniq, the school board for Nunavik.

  • The website for Nunavik Sivunitsavut, a place for Inuit from Nunavik to take a one-year college program during which students explore global modern issues from an Inuit perspective.


 

Nunavik

Nunavik has a population of just over 13,000 people, about 90% of whom are Inuit, living in 14 communities. Kuujjuaq is the largest centre, with about 2,400 people. Of the population over 15 years old, just over a quarter have some sort of post-secondary qualification.

The Kativik Ilisarniliriniq, the school board of Nunavik, was created in 1975, under the James Bay and Northern Quebec Agreement (JBNQA). Since 1978, the Kativik Ilisarniliriniq has been the exclusive provider of academic services to the population of Nunavik. The education programs developed by the school board are offered in all schools of the 14 Nunavik communities, in Inuktitut as first language and in French and English as second languages. The school board operates 17 primary and secondary schools as well as 5 adult education centres.

There is no post-secondary institution in Nunavik. Kativik Ilisarniliriniq provides post-secondary support (both practical and financial) to students from the region who attend post-secondary institutions outside the region. In 2015-16, it was sponsoring 127 post-secondary students. It also provides diploma level vocational training in twelve subjects, mostly delivered in Kuujjuaq and Inukjuaq in 2015-16, 420 people were taking adult education and vocational training courses.

 


Useful links:

  • The website for Kativik Ilisarniliriniq, the school board for Nunavik.

  • The website for Nunavik Sivunitsavut, a place for Inuit from Nunavik to take a one-year college program during which students explore global modern issues from an Inuit perspective.


 

Nunatsiavut

Nunatsiavut has a population of more than 2,500 people. The vast majority identify as Inuit. In 2005, The Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement (LILCN) was signed by the Labrador Inuit, the Government of Canada and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador. This created Nunatsiavut. The region is approximately 15,800 square kilometers. There is no post-secondary institution run by the Nunatsiavut Government, but there is a branch of Memorial University, the Labrador Institute, located in Happy Valley-Goose Bay. In July 2020, a new School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies of Memorial University was created at the Labrador Institute; the new School is in the process of developing undergraduate and graduate degrees, diplomas, and certificates, as well as post-graduate programming. The School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies was developed in partnership with the Nunatsiavut government, the Innu Nation, and NunatuKavut, and the Academic Council is co-governed.

The Nunatsiavut government has made previous partnerships with Memorial University to deliver programs. For instance, ten students graduated from the five-year Inuit Bachelor of Education program, a one-time partnership between Nunatsiavut government and Memorial University; previously, Nunatsiavut partnered with Memorial to offer the Inuit Bachelor of Social Work program.

The Nunatsiavut government pays for several expenses related to post-secondary education for beneficiaries, including tuition, living allowance, travel, and books/equipment. It also runs a program called Inuit Pathways that delivers adult education and training for jobs.

 


Useful links:


 

Nunatsiavut

Nunatsiavut has a population of more than 2,500 people. The vast majority identify as Inuit. In 2005, The Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement (LILCN) was signed by the Labrador Inuit, the Government of Canada and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador. This created Nunatsiavut. The region is approximately 15,800 square kilometers. There is no post-secondary institution run by the Nunatsiavut Government, but there is a branch of Memorial University, the Labrador Institute, located in Happy Valley-Goose Bay. In July 2020, a new School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies of Memorial University was created at the Labrador Institute; the new School is in the process of developing undergraduate and graduate degrees, diplomas, and certificates, as well as post-graduate programming. The School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies was developed in partnership with the Nunatsiavut government, the Innu Nation, and NunatuKavut, and the Academic Council is co-governed.

The Nunatsiavut government has made previous partnerships with Memorial University to deliver programs. For instance, ten students graduated from the five-year Inuit Bachelor of Education program, a one-time partnership between Nunatsiavut government and Memorial University; previously, Nunatsiavut partnered with Memorial to offer the Inuit Bachelor of Social Work program.

The Nunatsiavut government pays for several expenses related to post-secondary education for beneficiaries, including tuition, living allowance, travel, and books/equipment. It also runs a program called Inuit Pathways that delivers adult education and training for jobs.

 


Useful links:


 

Nunatsiavut

Nunatsiavut has a population of more than 2,500 people. The vast majority identify as Inuit. In 2005, The Labrador Inuit Land Claims Agreement (LILCN) was signed by the Labrador Inuit, the Government of Canada and the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador. This created Nunatsiavut. The region is approximately 15,800 square kilometers. There is no post-secondary institution run by the Nunatsiavut Government, but there is a branch of Memorial University, the Labrador Institute, located in Happy Valley-Goose Bay. In July 2020, a new School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies of Memorial University was created at the Labrador Institute; the new School is in the process of developing undergraduate and graduate degrees, diplomas, and certificates, as well as post-graduate programming. The School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies was developed in partnership with the Nunatsiavut government, the Innu Nation, and NunatuKavut, and the Academic Council is co-governed.

The Nunatsiavut government has made previous partnerships with Memorial University to deliver programs. For instance, ten students graduated from the five-year Inuit Bachelor of Education program, a one-time partnership between Nunatsiavut government and Memorial University; previously, Nunatsiavut partnered with Memorial to offer the Inuit Bachelor of Social Work program.

The Nunatsiavut government pays for several expenses related to post-secondary education for beneficiaries, including tuition, living allowance, travel, and books/equipment. It also runs a program called Inuit Pathways that delivers adult education and training for jobs.

 


Useful links:


 

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